SPH4U

 

 ADE Schools

COURSE OUTLINE FOR PHYSICS GRADE 12

 

Development Resource : The Ontario Curriculum, Science Grades 11 and 12

School : Academy of Distance Education

Department : Science

Course Developer : Department of Science

Development Date : April 2011

Course Type : University Preparation

Course Code : SPH4U

Credit Value : 1.0

Number of Scheduled hours : 110

Prerequisite : Physics Grade 11, SPH3U

Origin of Course: This course has been developed in the ADE Schools
                     department for Science using the document,
 
“Ontario Curriculum, Science Grades 11 and 12t, 2008 Revised.”

 

Course Description
This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning, for example, how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

Overall Curriculum Expectations and Strands:

The Physics course is divided into 6 strands.

 

Strand A : Scientific Investigation Skills and Career Exploration

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

          demonstrate scientific investigation skills (related to both inquiry and research) in the four areas of skills (initiating 
and planning, performing and recording, analysing and interpreting, and communicating);

          identify and describe careers related to the fields of science under study, and describe the contributions of scientists,
including Canadians, to those fields.

 

Strand B : Dynamics

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

          Analyse technological devices that apply the principles of the dynamics of motion, and assess the technologies' social and environmental impact;

          Investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, forces involved in uniform circular motion and motion in a plane, and solve related problems;

         Demonstrate an understanding of the forces involved in uniform circular motion and motion in a plane.

 

Strand C : Energy and Momentum

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

          Analyse, and propose ways to improve, technologies or procedures that apply principles related to energy and momentum, and assess the social and environmental impact of these technologies or procedures;

          Investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, through laboratory inquiry or computer simulation, the relationship between the laws of conservation of energy and conservation of momentum, and solve related problems;

          Demonstrate an understanding of work, energy, momentum, and the laws of conservation of energy and conservation of momentum, in one and two dimensions.

Strand D : Gravitational, Electric and Magnetic Fields

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

          Analyse the operation of technologies that use gravitational, electric, or magnetic fields, and assess the technologies' social and environmental impact;

          Investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, gravitational, electric, and magnetic fields, and solve related problems;

         Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts, properties, principles, and laws related to gravitational, electric, and magnetic fields and their interactions with matter.

 

Strand E: The Wave Nature of Light

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

          Analyze technologies that use the wave nature of light, and assess their impact on society and the environment;

          Investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, the properties of waves and light, and solve related problems;

           Demonstrate an understanding of the properties of waves and light in relation to diffraction, refraction, interference , and polarization.

 

Strand F : Revolutions in Modern Physics: Quantum Mechanics and Special Relativity

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

          Analyse, with reference to quantum mechanics and relativity, how the introduction of new conceptual models and theories can influence and/or change scientific thought and lead to the development of new technologies;

           Investigate special relativity and quantum mechanics, and solve related problems;

          Demonstrate an understanding of the evidence that supports the basic concepts of quantum mechanics and Einstein's theory of special relativity.

Outline of the Course Content

Unit 1

Forces and Motion : Dynamics

24 hours

Unit 2

Energy and Momentum

22 hours

Unit 3

Electric, Gravitational and Magnetic Fields

22 hours

Unit 4

The Wave Nature of Light

22 hours

Unit 5

Matter-Energy Interface

20 hours

Total

 

110 hours

Teaching/ Learning Strategies

A Variety of teaching/ learning strategies will be used in this course to meet the needs of the different learning styles :

 

Direct teaching strategies

           lecture and note taking

           work and task sheets

           demonstrations

          teacher led review

Indirect teaching strategies

           debates

          oral presentations

           guided internet search

 

Independent learning activities

           Case Studies

           Lab based Inquiry- students perform investigations in the laboratory

           Research work

           Mind Maps

 

Cooperative strategies

           Small group cooperative group work

           Small group discussions

           Brainstorming

           jigsaws

Assessment / Evaluation Strategies

Numerous and varied assessment opportunities will be given to students and various strategies and tools will be employed throughout the course in order to achieve maximum precision and fairness in assessing how well students learned the curricular expectations of each strand and the course. Diagnostic assessments will be used to determine prior learning, students’ strengths and for planning purposes and therefore will not be used to determine term or final grades for report cards. Formative assessments will be used regularly as a learning tool and feedback mechanism to improve student learning and instructional strategies. Summative assessments will be used to provide final professional judgment and evaluation of student learning of curricular expectations and therefore will be used to evaluate term work and the final assessment for reporting purposes. When planning assessments, the curricular expectations will be reviewed and linked to the achievement categories to which they relate. This is to ensure that all the expectations are accounted for in instruction, and that achievement of the expectations is assessed within the appropriate categories. All three types of assessments are still further regrouped into three parts: assessment for learning, feedback mechanisms meant to enhance student learning (formative and diagnostic); assessment as learning, self assessment and peer assessment tools done led and /or teachers in which students learn how to independently assess the level of their own learning (diagnostic , formative)’ and assessment of learning(summative only), which is led by the teacher alone and is used for purposes of evaluation and reporting of student achievement to parents and other stake holders

A variety of assessment/ evaluation strategies will be used to assess students’ learning of the course expectations and also their progress in the four categories of the achievement chart, including opportunities for self and peer- assessment. In particular, the school embedded some assessments strategies to be used as actual teaching strategies to enhance student learning. Such assessments, in the form of formative assessments, are regulated by the ministry in the 2010 documents including the following:

 Observation (formal/informal) of students’ daily class work, homework, and their participation in class discussions

 Performance strategies

           Research and design projects

           Portfolios

          Multimedia presentations

           Lab investigations

 Paper/ Pencil strategies

           Work Sheets

           Essays and Reports

           Tests and Quizzes

           Exams

 Assessment tools include :

           Checklists

          Marking schemes

           Rating scales

          Rubrics

          Anecdotal records with suggestions for improvement

 

Evaluation:

Students learning of the course expectations will be evaluated in accordance with the four categories of the achievement chart.

 Term Evaluation : accounts for 70% of the overall grade for the course, and will be carried out throughout the academic year.

Quizzes        10%

Lab Reports 15%

Projects        15%

Tests             30%

-------------------------

          Total   70%


Summative Evaluation
 : this will account for 30% of the overall grade for the course, and will be carried out towards the end of the academic year.

Final Examination 20%

Cumulative performance task 10%

--------------------------------------------------------

Total 30%

 Main Resources

Main Textbook : Physics 12 (Nelson)

Print and electronic resources will also be used in various activities as appropriate.